A Sparkling Vintage Life

Monthly Archives: May 2019

Memorial Day

Photo licensed from 123rf.com

A special remembrance episode for all who’ve given their lives in the service of their country, including a reading of “In Flanders Fields.”  We will not forget!

If you’d prefer to read rather than listen, scroll down to find a transcript.

Show Notes:

“Taps” performed by Master Gunnery Sergeant Matthew Harding

Jennifer’s fiction:

You’re the Cream in My Coffee

Ain’t Misbehavin’

Songbird and Other Stories

Transcript of Episode 15: Memorial Day

Welcome to A Sparkling Vintage Life, where we talk about all things vintage and celebrate the grace and charm of an earlier era. It’s Memorial Day here in the United States, celebrated on the last Monday of May. Unlike Armed Forces Day, which celebrates all who currently serve in the Armed Forces, or Veterans’ Day, which recognizes all veterans, Memorial Day honors those who have died in the course of serving their country in the armed forces.

Other countries have similar celebrations honoring their war dead. I’d love to hear about them. This episode focuses on the remembrance in the U.S.

Several men in my family tree have served I the military, but the only one I know of who died in a war was my grandfather’s brother. He was Corporal John F. Lamont of Company F-132nd Infantry, and he was killed in action on October 9, 1918, in the Argonne. Those are just facts I discovered while researching the family history. I wish I knew more about John. Maybe over time I will be able to learn more. I would love to know what he was like, what he looked like, what kind of personality he had, how he enjoyed spending his time before his life was cruelly snuffed out.

Families and friends of the deceased have decorated graves since time immemorial, but Memorial Day–an official day to honor those who gave their lives in military service–dates from the 1860s, right after the American Civil War. There is some controversy over when and where the first official Memorial Day actually took place, with Columbus, Georgia; Columbus, Missouri; and Waterloo, New York being among the possible launch spots (newspaper misinformation is blamed for the confusion–‘twas every thus). Whatever the origin, on April 26, 1866, the graves of Confederate casualties of the Civil War were decorated with flowers, hence the name Decoration Day. Some Southern women were generous enough to also place flowers on the graves of Union soldiers buried in that region. This gracious gesture made the news, and the custom spread northward.

While there were variations seen across different regions of the country and different towns and cities, a typical Decoration Day celebration including a gathering of the townspeople at the local cemetery, where flowers would be placed on the graves of deceased servicemen. Often these flowers were placed by young girls dressed in white with red and blue sashes. As each serviceman’s name was called, a bouquet was placed on his or her grave. There might have been a church service, or a parade, and/or a potluck picnic. Almost certainly, sometime over the course of the day, a trumpeter would play Taps, that sweet, mournful bugle call. Overall Decoration Day was a solemn event without the joyous overtones of, say, the Fourth of July.

Today, people still visit cemeteries on Memorial Day. Sometimes there are still public ceremonies, but it seems more common these days to visit as family groups or individuals, and many people don’t go at all.

One tradition that has endured is the wearing of poppies. In 1915, Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, a physician with the Canadian Expeditionary Force who cared for many wounded during World War I, wrote the poem,  “In Flanders Fields.” He wrote it while seated in the back of an ambulance near the Battle of Ypres in the Flanders region of Belgium. Its opening lines refer to the fields of bright-red poppies that grew among the soldiers’ graves in that area.

In 1918, inspired by the poem, YWCA worker Moina Mitchell attended a YWCA conference wearing a silk poppy pinned to her coat and distributed over two dozen more to others present. In 1920, the National American Legion adopted it as their official symbol of remembrance. Today crepe-paper poppies are sold by several patriotic groups as a means of raising donations to benefit disabled veterans.

In 1868, Decoration Day was moved from April to May 30, so that chilly Northerners would also have some flowers to place on graves. In time the name changed to Memorial Day and expanded to honor those killed in all wars, not just the Civil War. The date remained May 30 until 1971, when the it was changed to the last Monday of May in accordance with the federal Uniform Monday Holiday Act (although a handful of hardy Southerners still cling to April 26).

Though some may resist smudging a perfect spring weekend with somber thoughts, I think it’s important to remember and to grieve. So many young men and women have given their lives for our freedom. This weekend, let’s each take at least a few moments between barbecues and ball games to remember those who gave their lives for their country and honor the sacrifice they’ve made. Maybe buy a poppy to wear, or have your children make some out of red crepe paper. If you know of a particular soldier, sailor, or marine, perhaps someone in your family or town or circle of friends and acquaintances, tell their stories to your children. so that the memories will live on.

And thank you, Uncle John.

Today’s grace note:

 

In Flanders Fields

by Lt. John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

    That mark our place; and in the sky

    The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

    Loved and were loved, and now we lie,

        In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

    The torch; be yours to hold it high.

    If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

        In Flanders fields.

Is Choral Singing the New Prozac?

Photo by Ian Allenden licensed from 123rf.com

From formal concert choirs to belting out tunes around a campfire with friends and family, research shows that singing as a group is good for us! So why does it seem to have gone out of style? Why do families no longer gather around the piano, or friends break into drinking songs down at the local pub? Jennifer discusses new research into the physical, mental, and psychological benefits of singing as a group, and why we need to bring it back.

If you prefer to read rather than listen, scroll down to read a transcription.


Show Notes:

The Surprising Health Benefits of Singing in a Choir” (article on Artistworks.com)

Daniel Pink’s quotes about choral music come from this book.


The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir by Jennifer Ryan

Some seventh-inning serenading at a Chicago White Sox game (hear “Na Na Hey Hey” at 1:44)

“Sweet Caroline” at Fenway Park and an even more fun rendition at Pitt.

Here’s a link to the famous Coke commercial that has infected the brains of so many generations. You’re welcome! 🙂

Jennifer’s fiction:

You’re the Cream in My Coffee

Ain’t Misbehavin’

Songbird and Other Stories

Transcription of Episode 14: Is Choral Singing the New Prozac?

I’ve just come back from a community choir rehearsal. I say “choir” when technically the particular group I sing with calls itself a “chorale.” I didn’t know what the difference was, so I went to Webster’s Dictionary, which defines a “choir” as an organized company of singers, a “chorus” as “an organized company of singers, especially who sing the choral parts of a work such as an opera, and a “chorale” as a synonym for “choir” or “chorus.” Not very helpful. Maybe some of you listeners who are better educated I the fine points of musical terminology can clue me in. At any rate, I choose to call my group a ‘choir” in casual conversation, because when I say “chorale”, meaning the musical group, some people think I’m saying “corral,” the place where you ride horses, and all sorts of misunderstandings ensue.

My community choir is rehearsing a lot these days, because we have a concert coming up in June. To be honest, I don’t always like going to rehearsal. Often I resent having to make space for it in my schedule, and I have to drag myself to the practice venue, and only my highly developed sense of personal responsibility spurs me on. Once I’m there, though, and once I’ve warmed up and am singing, my cares melt away, until the only thing I really care about is mastering that tricky passage that seems next to impossible, or counting the measure correctly. And when we do it right, when the conductor stops casting the evil eye toward my section and heaving deep sighs indicative of great pain and suffering, when he actually looks pleased, when all the parts come together, it feels glorious. I leave rehearsal tired in a different way. Physically tired, mentally fatigued, but somehow buoyed up in my spirit.

It turns out, there are actual scientific reasons for this. An article posted at Artistworks.com says recent research bears this out.  

According to the article, which I’ll link to in the show notes, humans bond best when we are making music with each other.

Studies show that our physical health is improved by singing: lower blood pressure, increased blood oxygen saturation, elevated immunity, stronger respiration, and less stuttering. Singing and other forms of music-making also produces measurable changes in the brain!

When we sing, we breathe deeply, as in meditation, with the same good effects like improvements in mood, decrease in stress, depression and anxiety.  These effects are even more enhanced in a group setting, compared to singing alone. In other words, singing alone is good, singing with others is even better.

Turns out humans like to have a sense of belonging to something bigger than ourselves, to be part of a larger community. We get that feeling when we sing in a group. And research shows that this deliberate synchronizing with others makes us feel more altruistic, more generous, more ethical, more helpful toward others, and more willing to respectfully listen to  others’ points of view. This is starting to sound a lot like “I’d like to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony”–extra points to those of you who are old enough to remember that iconic Coke commercial of old.

No less than the noted researcher and author Daniel Pink writes, “Exercise is one of the few activities in life that is indisputably good for us. Choral singing might be the new exercise.” Pink goes on to cite the following: “Choral singing calms the heart and boosts endorphin levels. It improves lung function. It increases pain thresholds and reduces the need for pain medication.”  Similar effects have been found in athletes who must synchronize efforts and their sense of timing, like dancers and rowers.

So, no wonder choir rehearsal makes me feel good … well, most of the time. But with all that good stuff coming out of singing together as a group, why has group singing mostly fallen out of favor nowadays? For example, lots of the older novels I like to read mention families gathering together around a piano to sing, just for fun, or people going caroling at Christmas, or singing folk songs on a hayride or around a bonfire.  Workers used to sing together to make the long days pass more quickly. Thus we have a whole treasury of folk songs centered around the railroad, the mine, the forest, the farm … even the prison yard. Maybe today’s professions don’t lend themselves to singing as much as the professions of yore. There are no software-coding songs that I know of.

 Schools had songs, and sports teams had songs. Outside of singing the National Anthem, and maybe “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” at the seventh-inning stretch, or “Sweet Caroline” or “Na-na-hey-hey,” do sports fans sing anymore?

Some writers have put forth theories about why we don’t sing together anymore. One is that we’ve turned from a culture of participation to a culture of performance. We pay to watch professionals perform and keep our own mouths shut. A hundred years or more ago, people also paid to watch professionals perform. Singers like Enrico Caruso and Jenny Lind drew crowds. But listening to the pros didn’t stop people from also gathering around the piano at home. So why does it stop us now, if it does stop it? Even some of our churches have given in to this nowadays, disbanding the traditional choir and sitting back to listen to the worship band perform instead of singing together as a congregation.

The rise of streaming music has also meant a splintering of what we listen to. There is no common body of songs that everybody knows, like the Top 40 of my youth. I remember driving on a highway late one night with my brother and his wife. To pass the time, we sang as many pop songs as we could think of, the ones we liked and even the ones we hated, and we laughed and laughed. Today, with everybody tuned to their own individual downloads, I don’t think people today have a common songbook like that. Do they? It’s hard to sing together if you don’t all know the words.

For whatever reason, group singing seems to have fallen out of favor. Members of community choirs like my own tend to be older, looking, as one wag put it, like a bunch of cotton swabs on stage with all that white hair. As these music-lovers die out, who will take their place? My sense is that, to the younger generation, singing as a group is nerdy and uncool. And that makes me sad. People who feel that way are missing out on all those great physical and mental health benefits mentioned earlier, and the sheer joy of learning new music or pulling out old favorites and singing them together. They’re missing out, and that makes me sad. It makes me want to teach the world to sing. In perfect harmony. I’d like to buy the world a Coke. And keep it company.

Why don’t you try group singing sometime soon? Start small, maybe with your family, in the car on a long trip. In church, open your mouth and actually sing the hymns with gusto–don’t sit back and let the worship band do all the heavy lifting.  

Today’s grace note is a book I’ve been enjoying called The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir by Jennifer Ryan. It’s historical fiction set in England during World War II. With most of the men away fighting in the war, it’s decided that the choir of the local church should be disbanded. The women in the choir rebel at this, and choose to carry on singing, resurrecting themselves as the Chilbury Ladies’ Choir. While most of the novel focuses on the individual stories of the women involved, the common bond of the choir sustains and encourages them during difficult times. If you like books like Lilac Girls and The Nightingale, this might be a good one for you. Unlike many novels set during wartime, this one is not depressing or gloomy, but more about courage and camaraderie. Of course I’ll put a link the show notes, which can be found at sparklingvintagelife.com/podcast. You can also leave a comment there.  

If you have a topic you’d like me to cover or a question you’d like answered on A Sparkling Vintage Life, feel free to send me an email at jenny@sparklingvintagelife.com. Also, if you can take a few minutes to stop by iTunes or Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts and leave a star rating, or even better write a quick review, that will help raise the visibility of this little show so that more of gentle souls like you can find it.

Joy in the Morning

Photo by Jennifer Lamont Leo

From Miracle Morning to Before Breakfast, morning rituals and routines are a hot topic these days. Join Jennifer as she discusses her own preference for mornings and looks at the daily rituals of some notable people of the past. 

If you prefer to read rather than listen, scroll down to find a transcript.

 

Show Notes:

You’re the Cream in My Coffee eBook is FREE May 13 through May 17, 2019: https://www.amazon.com/Youre-Cream-Coffee-Roaring-Twenties-ebook/dp/B01JD9XJ3S

Mason Currey’s books:

Daily Rituals: https://www.amazon.com/Daily-Rituals-How-Artists-Work-ebook/dp/B009Y4I4OM

Daily Rituals: Women Who Work: https://www.amazon.com/Daily-Rituals-Women-at-Work-ebook/dp/B07FLNRYNR

Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod https://www.amazon.com/Miracle-Morning-Not-So-Obvious-Guaranteed-Transform-ebook/dp/B00AKKS278

Before Breakfast podcast by Laura Vanderkam https://lauravanderkam.com/before-breakfast-podcast/

Jennifer’s fiction:

You’re the Cream in My Coffee

Ain’t Misbehavin’

Songbird and Other Stories

Transcript of Episode 13: Joy in the Morning

Welcome to A Sparkling Vintage Life, where we talk about all things vintage and celebrate the grace and charm of an earlier era. I’m your host, Jennifer Leo, and it’s May 12, 2019, as I record this.  

This is Episode number thirteen of the podcast–a baker’s dozen.

It’s full-on spring here in North Idaho, and I’ve been enjoying sitting on the deck in the morning with my coffee, overlooking the mountains. My early-morning deck-sitting has  inspired me to focus  this week’s episode on the unique and special value of mornings. More on that in a minute.

First I wanted to let you know that my first novel, YOU’RE THE CREAM IN MY COFFEE eBook edition will be FREE this week on Amazon, May 13 through 17, 2019. You’re the Cream in My Coffee is the first book in the Roaring Twenties series, a clean, sweet romance set in 1920s Chicago. Small-town girl Marjorie Corrigan travels to Chicago and thinks she sees her first love, believed killed in the Great War, standing alive and well in a train station. Of course she needs to find out whether it’s really him, and if so, why he never came home. Meanwhile, she has a fiance waiting for her to come home as the ticking time bomb of their wedding looms. If that sounds like your kind of story,  I encourage you to download it for FREE this week on Amazon. I’ll put a link in the show notes.

And now on to today’s topic about mornings. In case you haven’t noticed, the topic of mornings, especially morning routines and rituals meant to maximize productivity, is having a moment. It’s quite trendy these days for people to talk about how they make the most of their mornings, describing all the things they do after waking up to set themselves up to have a productive day. From Hal Elrod’s book Miracle Morning to Laura Vanderkam’s podcast Before Breakfast, it seems like everyone who’s anyone has something to share about the value of morning. but this is really nothing new. As the old adage goes, An ounce of morning is worth a pound of afternoon, in terms of getting things done.

I love mornings. I love to get up early, watching the sun come up, if possible. There’s something about morning that’s fresh and clean. I feel well-rested after a good night’s sleep, and my energy is as high as it will be all day. I also feel a tremendous sense of optimism early in the morning, like anything’s possible. Psalm 30:35 tells us that weeping lasts for a night, but joy comes in the morning. I have found this to be true. Problems that loom large in the middle of the night seems somehow diminished in the light of day.

I generally wake up around five a.m. and putter around for an hour, reading and writing in my journal. If I want to have a peaceful morning I find it helpful not to plunge into email and social media first thing, but it’s hard to resist that temptation sometimes. Another key is that, while I like to wake up early, I do not like to socialize early, nor do I like to get dressed and leave the house right away. I like to float around in solitude and ease into my day. After I’ve been up around an hour or so, my husband and I meet up for coffee on the deck in summer or in front of the pellet stove in winter. By then I’m awake enough to be suitable company. We talk about everything under the sun, and we have our daily devotional and prayer time together. After that I do my morning routine of house chores and exercise and then settle down at my desk. I try to reserve mornings for creative work, when I’m still fresh and rested. After lunch my energy flags, and I find that’s the best time to do more administrative or marketing tasks, or to run errands or see friends. But mornings are for writing and creativity, and I really try to protect that time, because once it’s gone, it’s gone. By evening time, I might have a second burst of creativity, but more often I’m mostly brain dead and will need a full night’s sleep to recharge.

Because I like to look back at how people in the past lived their lives, and I know you do too, I looked around for how others have spent their mornings and found the work of Mason Currey.  Using biographies, autobiographies, diaries and letters, Mr. Currey studied the daily lives of creative people–artists, writers, musicians, inventors, scientists–through the ages, looking for clues to how they spent their time. A surprising number of these productive individuals were morning people. I of course was most interested in the writers. Octavia Butler, for example, finds 3 or 4 o’clock in the morning the best time to write. Like me, she started writing early because she was working a day job and found she was too tired to write in the evenings, but after sleep she was ready to write.

The famous playwright Lillian Hellman lived on a farm. She got up and 5 and helped with milking cows or cleaning the barn, then she had breakfast and got to her writing work.

Margaret Bourke-White was a pioneering photojournalist in the mid-20th century. In her autobiography she noted “I am a morning writer. The world is all fresh and new then, and made for the imagination. I keep an odd schedule that would be possibly only for someone with no family demands–to bed at eight, up at four.”

In the early 20th century, Edith Wharton wrote fiction each morning while still in bed, writing longhand on sheets of paper that she dropped onto the floor for her secretary to retrieve and type up. A visitor recalled that she wrote with “her writing board perilously furnished with an inkpot on her knee, the dog of the moment under her left elbow on the bed strewn with correspondence, newspapers and books.” Mason Currey notes, “Wharton always worked in the morning, and houseguests were expected to entertain themselves until 11 a.m. or noon, when the hostess would emerge from her private quarters, ready to go for a walk or work in the garden.”

And one of this podcaster’s favorite people, the doyenne of etiquette, Emily Post, woke at 6:30 a.m. and, while still in bed, set immediately to work. Her son remembered, quote, “She had improvised an arrangement which enabled her to get her own breakfast as early as she wished and while remaining in bed. A thermos of hot coffee, another small one of cream, butter in an iced container, zwieback and the dark buckwheat honey she loved were placed on a tray on her bedsitde table every night. She would breakfast and then, remaining in bed, write, edit copy, and plan her correspondence. .. No telephone calls, no visitors, no household interruptions were permitted to break in on her working time. After twelve she rose, dressed, and was ready and hungry for luncheon punctually at one.”

And the well-known Southern writer Eudora Welty also liked to write first thing, usually still in her nightgown.

For those creatives who were also parents, many of them got up early to get some work in before their children were awake. Others hit the desk as soon as the children left for school. Either way, they made the most of the limited time they had available.

Of course, not all of us are cut out to be morning people. A sizeable segment of the population are night owls, preferring to work late into the night and to sleep in late.

 “In the morning sow your seed, and at evening withhold not your hand, for you do not know which will prosper, this or that, or whether both alike will be good.” (Ecc. 11:6). In a note about this verse Pastor John MacArthur reminds us, “The world is full of things over which one has no control, including the purposes of God. There is no virtue in wishful wondering, but there’s hope for those who get busy and do their work.” And I’ll add, whether you do it in the morning or evening or middle of the day. As for me, I’ll take the morning.

How about you? When do you prefer to do your most important tasks? Are an early-morning lark or a late-night owl? Drop by the show notes, or visit me on Facebook and leave a comment.

If you have a question you’d like me to answer or a topic you’d like me to address on A Sparkling Vintage Life, feel free to send me an email at jenny@sparklingvintagelife.com. Also, if you can take a few minutes to stop by iTunes or Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts and leave a star rating, or even better write a quick review, that will help raise the visibility of this little show so that more of our kindred spirits can find it. And I’ll be back in a minute with today’s grace note.

Today’s grace note is the work of Mason Currey, whom I mentioned earlier. Specifically his two books, Daily Rituals and Women Who Work. Daily Rituals describes the working habits of 161 inspired—and inspiring—minds, among them, novelists, poets, playwrights, painters, philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians, who describe how they subtly maneuver the many (self-inflicted) obstacles and (self-imposed) daily rituals to get done the work they love to do, whether by waking early or staying up late; whether by self-medicating with doughnuts or bathing, drinking vast quantities of coffee, or taking long daily walks. 

The second volume: Daily Rituals: Women Who Work, covers similar territory but specifically focused on women. Mr. Currey found that often the male achievers in his first book benefited from the support of wives or assistants who carried the burden of making daily life run smoothly so he was free to do his work. Women generally were the ones who provided that support for others, making sure that everyone gets fed and has clean shirts to wear and  So the working lives of women creatives looked different enough from the men’s lives to warrant a second book.  I’ll put links to both these books in the show notes, and hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

And that’s our show for this week. Have a lovely day, and tune in next week when I’ll discuss another aspect of A Sparkling Vintage Life.

Everything’s coming up roses

Rose pin from 1928 Jewelry Company

We have a winner! In the recent giveaway on the Sparkling Vintage Life podcast, the winner of the beautiful rose pin (pictured above) from 1928 Jewelry Company is Jenny Manzke! (I’m afraid mispronounced the name in the podcast…my deepest apologies!) Thank you to Jenny and to everyone who entered the drawing. There will be another giveaway soon, so stay tuned in to the podcast. Meanwhile, subscribe to my newsletter at right so you know when the next one’s coming up!

Sparkling Vintage Motherhood

Photo source:http://123rf.com

In honor of mothers everywhere, Jennifer honors one particular mother of the early 20th century. What was the old-fashioned “secret” of her success in raising a world-famous, influential son? Tune in for some good, old-fashioned talk about vintage parenting.

If you prefer to read rather than listen, scroll down for the transcript.

Show notes:

Ain’t Misbehavin’ eBook FREE through May 4, 2019

The Modern Lady podcast

https://www.facebook.com/modernladypodcast/

The Sparkling Vintage Ladies’ Reading Circle

Jennifer’s fiction:

You’re the Cream in My Coffee

Ain’t Misbehavin’

Songbird and Other Stories

TRANSCRIPT FOR EPISODE 5:

Welcome to A Sparkling Vintage Life, where we talk about all things vintage and celebrate the grace and charm of an earlier era. I’m your host, Jennifer Leo, and it’s May 1, 2019, as I record this.

This is Episode number twelve of the podcast–an even dozen. As this upcoming Sunday is Mother’s Day, I wanted this episode to focus on those of you who are mothers and the tremendous impact you can and do have on the world.

But first, a little update. I’m very pleased to announce that the winner of the rose pin giveaway drawing is Jenny Manzke. Congratulations, Jenny, and thank you to all who entered the contest. I promise to run another giveaway soon, as they are fun and also give us a chance to get to know each other a little bit better.

Also, my novel AIN’T MISBEHAVIN’ eBook edition is available for FREE this week on Amazon, through May 4, 2019. Ain’t Misbehavin’ is a clean, sweet romance set in 1920s Chicago. A glamorous jazz singer who falls in love with a conservative small-town businessman and mayhem ensues. If that sounds like your kind of story,  I encourage you to download it for FREE this week on Amazon. I’ll put a link in the show notes.

Last week there was no new episode as I was visiting my father in Illinois. He’s doing great. Thanks to those of you who asked about him. He’s 91 years old and still going strong.  As a postscript to the previous episode about travel and how much it’s changed over the years, my misgivings about plane travel were confirmed on this trip. My carry-on bag was searched thoroughly at O’Hare on the grounds of something suspicious. After my personal possessions were pawed through and put on display for the whole world to see, the culprit was found–it was a small coin purse filled with loose change that had apparently triggered the apparatus for detecting metal. So be on alert, ladies. Empty those coin purses before you fly. All kidding aside, I truly am grateful for the hardworking men and women of the TSA who strive to keep airline travel safe for everyone. It’s just disheartening when you’re the one who is picked out for search, and so undignified to have one’s most personal belongings tossed about. But I suppose that’s the price we have to pay for living in today’s world. Just one of the things that makes me long earlier times when travel wasn’t quite so fraught with fear.

Since my return, it’s been a busy week of catching up. I continue to write the Hollywood novel, aiming for a self-imposed, and perhaps somewhat unrealistic, deadline of June 30 to finish the first draft. I also finished up the museum exhibit labels about railroads, and completed a couple of editing projects. I also celebrated my birthday in there somewhere by going out to a delicious seafood dinner with my husband, so that was fun.  If we have to continue growing older, I find it’s best to celebrate the years and not bemoan them. Age comes upon us whether we want it to or not, so we might as well welcome it.

And now on to today’s topic in honor of mothers. First I must tell you, if you haven’t already guessed, that I’m not a mother myself. This is one of the deepest disappointments of my life. It makes Mother’s Day and the weeks running up to it excruciatingly painful at times. I find early May to be a good time to take a break from social media. But of course, I had a mother, and also a couple of wonderful grandmothers and a few marvelous aunts, and so around Mother’s Day I try to concentrate on the good memories I have of them instead of bemoaning my own barren state. Anyway, it does no good to complain about things we can’t change. I just want you to know that if your heart is hurting this Mother’s Day, for whatever reason, my heart goes out to you.

This year, to celebrate Mother’s Day in “Sparkling Vintage” style, I set out to find one specific mother who lived during our favorite time period of the early 20th century, someone who exemplified the kind of mother who makes an impact on the world through her children. And that is how I learned about a woman whose name was Morrow.

Morrow Coffey was born in North Carolina in 1892. In 1916 she married a man named William. Together the couple took up dairy farming and reared three children, but one thing that set them apart from many couples was that from the very first day of their marriage, they established a time of daily Bible reading and prayer. Morrow was once quoted as saying, “There’s only one right way to live and it’s all laid out in the Bible.” Although I’m sure she said it in a much more charming Southern accent. So the family would rise at dark o’clock in the morning to milk their large herd of cows. At breakfast they’d pray together, and Morrow would read a Bible verse off of a daily calendar, helping the children memorize verses. Then the kids would head off for school and Morrow and her husband William would spend their day doing the countless chores necessary to run a busy household and a working dairy farm. In the evening, tired as they must have been after a long, busy day, the family would gather once more to read the Bible and pray.

Morrow had her hands full, caring for her home and family during an era that straddled two world wars and the Great Depression in between. She would have done without so many of the modern conveniences available to us today. On the other hand, she lacked some of the distractions. She may have had radio but no TV, and certainly no Internet or social media, so perhaps not quite the same competition for her children’s attention. Still, as busy as she was, Morrow made the spiritual life of her children a high priority. She believed that the diligent prayers of a mother, and the disciplines imposed to develop their spiritual lives, would greatly influence her children’s choices as they grew up.

And she was right. Thanks to those quiet, patient lessons at home, one of Morrow’s grew up to have a had great impact for Christ all over the world over seventy years of ministry. You may have heard of him. He was the late evangelist, Billy Graham. Billy once described his upbringing this way: ““What we did have back then [during the Depression] was family solidarity. We really cared about each other, and we liked to do things together. Jesus’ word picture of a hen gathering her brood under her wing fits my mother. She saw to it that we gathered frequently and regularly—and not just around the dinner table or in front of the radio for favorite broadcasts. She gathered us around herself and my father to listen to Bible stories, to join in family prayers, and to share a sense of the presence of God.”

Today you can visit Morrow Graham’s former home on the former dairy farm. It’s now part of the Billy Graham Library and open to the public.

Of course, not all of a mother’s efforts will produce a man like Billy Graham. There are no guarantees. Some of the most diligent loving parents bring up children who eventually go astray, and some negligent parents manage to rear some amazing offspring. But Morrow’s life illustrates that it’s the day-to-day, habitual lessons and routines that have the best likelihood of being absorbed into children’s minds and hearts.

Whoever you are, and whatever your status as mother, grandmother, aunt, teacher, coach, or maybe just a friend, invest in the lives of children you know. Teach them your values, and help them develop the skills, habits, and thought patterns you want them to have as adults. Like Morrow Graham, you never know where your efforts might lead.

Happy Mother’s Day.!

If you have a question you’d like me to answer or a topic you’d like me to address, drop me a line at jenny@sparklingvintagelife.com. If you can take a few minutes to stop by iTunes or Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts and leave a positive review, that will help raise the visibility of the show so others can find it.

Today’s grace note is a podcast I’ve been enjoying called “The Modern Lady Podcast.” Whether you’re a mom or not, you’ll enjoy hearing hosts Lindsay and Michelle discuss a wide variety of topics that are of interest to women, in a warm, witty, and dignified manner. As I said earlier, I’m not a mom, and I still find most of their episodes fascinating and fun, like listening to friends talk around a kitchen table. Plus they always include an etiquette tip, along with the thought process behind it, that speaks to my own vintage-loving heart. Interesting and intelligent podcasts for women that are also clean and wholesome to listen to aren’t that easy to come by nowadays, so if you like podcasts, I encourage  you to give the Modern Lady podcast a try.

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Jennifer Lamont Leo